Oldtown
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Description

In the era of Dance of the Dragons, Oldtown is the oldest of Westerosi cities and one of the premier ports on the continent. It is on the Whispering Sound, at the southwestern edge of the continent of Westeros.

The Citadel, where Maesters are trained, is located here, making Oldtown the seat of Westerosi history and learning. The Starry Sept is here. It is the Seat of the Faith of the Seven; the Great Sept of Baelor in King's Landing does not yet exist.

The lords of Oldtown are House Hightower, kings of the First Men, now bannermen to the Tyrells. Their seat is the Hightower, a great white lighthouse and the tallest structure in Westeros. Its beacon is visible several miles out to sea, and it is one of the Nine Wonders Made by Man written about by Lomas Longstrider.

Oldtown is an ancient and gracious city, with clean, stone-cobbled streets that cross over little rivers and canals. These tamed tributaries to the Honeywine are strictly patrolled where they are uncovered and cleverly diverted by old fitted stone, such that all but the worst neighbourhoods have a stream fit to drink from and another for dumping filth. There are stone buildings that have stood and been maintained for thousands of years, some breathtakingly grand and some simple. Between the main thoroughfares, the city is a labyrinth of twisting wynds and allies. Oldtown lacks the widespread squalor of King's Landing and most of the stink and is considerably safer for gentlefolk. Less-than-gentle-folk might be made unwelcome by the watch if they visit the wrong neighbourhoods. It's the largest and most beautiful city on the continent, and a draw for many people.

Campaigns Set in Oldtown

Campaign Summary

Directory

A B C D
1 Sphinx Street - A,1 Citadel Bridge - B,1 Appletree Wynd - C,1 Beacon Boulevard - D,1
2 Starry Street - A,2 Starry Bridge - B,2 Oldtown Square - C,2 Undercity - D,2
3 Whispering Wharf - A,3 Hightower Bridge - B,3 Harbour Plaza - C,3 Ragpyker Wynd - D,3

Locations and Residents

Oldtown is a maze of alleys, streets, and canals, thousands of places to explore, visit or get lost forever in. The locations listed focus on several main areas throughout Oldtown. Starting with the main waterway that goes through the city from the Whispering Sound northwards, The Honeywine River. The Citadel and Hightower are the two most important locations found on the River on opposite ends of the city. On the west bank of the river there is a smaller portion of the city than there is on the east bank, but to the west is still many an important location on Sphinx Street to the west of the Citadel and north of Starry Street. Starry Street is the religious heart of the city and is the location of the Starry Sept, the seat of the Faith of the Seven among other smaller shrines, temples and the like to the other gods and goddesses of the world. The southeast most side of the city is dominated by The Wharves and houses the smaller sailing vessels that have trouble should the Whispering Sound become turbulent. The east bank is home to Appletree Wynd which is east of the Citadel and north of Oldtown Street, which is north of Hightower Street to the east of Battle Island that is at the base of The Hightower. The further east in the city, the older and seedier it gets with places like Ragpyker Wynd where the secretive entrance into the most dangerous part of Oldtown, the Undercity, can be found. There is one place in the east of town that's a stark contrast from the slums to the south. In the northeast most part of the city is Beacon Boulevard. The Boulevard leads to the main gate in and out of the city and along the tree-studded immaculate road noble estates and houses cast long shadows over the slums to the south.

Appletree Wynd

A large residential street that wynds it way down from Beacon Boulevard toward the Citadel and the Honeywine River to the west and southwardly to the commercial hub of the city, Oldtown Square. The cobblestones are quite new and fresh here, and there is a pleasant, perfumed smell mingling with the salt air. The well-kept apple trees that line the road also provide a pleasant odour and some lovely shade.

Ne'er a rotten apple or any other sort of clutter to be found on the ground. The roomy manses of the rich and famous sit cheek by jowl. Banners hang down from poles in the centre of the street, with the Hightower of Oldtown fluttering proudly upon them in the breeze. There is a pleasant view of the river in the west from here, and of the Hightower in the far south.

The shops here cater to those with rich tastes. Baubles, musical instruments, jewellery, silks, satins, finely wrought armour and armaments and varies other shiny things meant to catch the eye of well-to-do city-dwells with stags or dragons burning holes in their purses.

Apple Blossom Teahouse

Apple-Blossom-Teahouse.jpg


This is an elegant place, with broad steps that lead up from the Wynd to a floor that is ten or twelve feet above street level. Two men in gleaming armour guard them. There are tall arched windows with lace drapes to frame them. Delicate carved and silver-leafed chairs and tables set in front of them, allowing patrons to sit in comfort and look down on the people in the square. The entire place is decorated in silver and pale blue.

The Teahouse is a favourite among those too genteel to visit taverns, and among well-to-do women who prefer not to host their friends at home lest it is noticed that they're not as rich as they'd like to seem. One cannot get a proper meal, but any number of cakes and dainties and fancy fruit and cheese plates are served, along with wine and sweet drinks. The star beverage is, of course, their apple blossom tea among other tea varieties.

Honeyed Home - House Beesbury

Architecture reminiscent of the Beesbury seat, Honeyholt, the home is multi-leveled slope sided tiered partial domes with a stained glass dome made of honeycomb-shaped stained glass windows in different shades of yellow and clear glass. Similarly, every level has several windows again in stained glass honeycomb-shaped. The pathway from gate to the front door is an enclosed arbor of more honeycomb glass. This protects the visitors to the house from the ample amount of honey bees that fly and buzz from peach tree and thick heather that is planted in the front and back yards of the Honeyed Home. Beehives are stationed throughout the gardens strategically.

Inside the home, the honey theme persists. Honey hues are dominant against black stone and ebony wood in the walls and furniture. The floor is all hardwood done in honeycomb patterns.

Bethally Beesbury Corden Beesbury

Sunflower Manse - House Cuy

Foxearth Manse - House Florent

Tom Tinker

Luthier's Shop and Home - Masterful Quality Musical Instrument Shop

Butterfly's Home - House Mullendore

The

Beacon Boulevard

((High nobility.))

The boulevard is a large, stately passage, wide and well-furnished with green grass, trees, and flower-gardens. There are benches for one to sit and rest a bit between their travels, made of smooth grey stone. The massive main gates into the city to the northeast is where the Boulevard ends. Within the gates is The Watch House, the armoury, and barracks for Oldtown's Watch. While the exterior of the walls and gatehouse is austere, the inside of the walls and gatehouse are buttressed and filigreed with images of sphinxes and many columns are fashioned to replicate the Hightower. Intricate and breathtaking as only a noble quarter should be. Almost every major noble house has a manse or estate in Oldtown. The homes away from home of most of the Great Houses can all be found along Beacon Boulevard. Once the boulevard reaches the gatehouse, outside of the city it becomes the famous Roseroad which travels to Highgarden and then all the way to King's Landing.

Moon's Nest Manse - Arryn Estate

The great noble estates that are on Beacon Boulevard are arranged in the neighbourhood much like they are in Westeros. That puts the Arryn estate just south of the northeastern position Roseroad Gate. It is furnished with an eye to comfort as well as a tasteful display of wealth. Much of the furniture is highlighted with gilding, and the walls are painted in rich tones that suggest opulence.

The main hall is decorated in blues and creamy white. The grand hearth is surrounded by ceramic tiles in a bright blue glaze. Every third one has a miniature scene of a falcon in flight over mountains painted on it, each different and lovingly rendered. Gilt-legged couches and chairs are arranged around it. The west wing has great double doors leading to the dining room, and a sweeping staircase leading up goes to the east wing. The stairs are carpeted in blue, its railings painted white with gilt details.

Across the hall from the main entrance is a circular pair of doors are made from wood, lead and stained glass in the shape of the family crest. Through the clear bits of glass that make up the moon charge, the beautiful private garden can be made out.

Stag Horn Manse - Baratheon Estate

The great noble estates that are on Beacon Boulevard are arranged in the neighbourhood much like they are in Westeros. With the Targaryen Royal Estate located elsewhere in the city, that puts the Baratheon estate just south the Arryns and north of the Dornish Embassy.

The manse is not large by the standards of the Oldtown rich, but it's imposing. The black double doors, each marked with a gilded stag, open to an impressive and spacious room. A massive chandelier made from hundreds of interlocked gilded stag antlers lights the room with many candles. The floors are polished black marble, flecked with gold, and gleaming. There's a large black and gold Myrish rug in the centre. Long benches upholstered in black and gold line the walls, which are decorated with colourful tapestries of hunting scenes, brightening the colour-scheme of the place.

An open arch leads into the dining room. A grand and sweeping staircase with gilt and lacquered rails and midnight black carpet held in place across the steps with golden rods, splays across the back of the room, leading up. On either side of it, there are doors leading out into the walled garden that backs the house.

Dorne Embassy

The walls of the great hall are hung with fine woven tapestries, but most magnificent of all is the painted ceiling overhead. Washed in rich midnight blue, it is dotted by a thousand gold stars charting the constellations of the Dornish night sky.

There's a narrow balcony running the length of the room above the big main doors. It allows the servants to open and close sliding iron shutters over the tall windows that flood the room with light in the daytime. They're made up of tiny diamond-shaped panes of thick wavery glass and don't offer much of a view of the outside, but the balcony does make a fine place to watch the comings and goings of the gentry.

At the far side of the hall, there's a low platform with a few heavy chairs in a row behind a table, seating for the Lord and Lady and the most favoured notables. Just below it stands two long tables. There is plenty of room for more to be set up if need be, but space is ordinarily left open but for a few velvet-padded settees. Corridors lead off the room on both sides, their openings between the tapestries.

Lion's Leap Manse - Lannister Estate

This is a grand manse maintained by the Lannister family for when they wish to stay in Oldtown. The house faces the prestigious Beacon Boulevard. The first story is protected by narrow high windows that stop people from seeing inside, but the big windows on the back wall and the four upper stories make the manse bright and airy overall. The first floor's main hall is brightly lit with lamps to make up for the shortcomings of the street-facing windows, and the walls are covered in tapestries of rich crimson and gold. There's a grand dining room separated from the entry hall by a broad doorway. The house is richly decorated and well-appointed, with luxurious furnishings.

Like almost all of the houses in Oldtown, it shares two walls with its neighbours on either side, but the servants quarters, kitchens, and servant's stairs buffer the house proper from any noise that could possibly leak through the thick stone walls. A grander staircase allows the residents and their guests access to the upper stories. There's a pleasant walled garden in the back, viewed from the windows in the back wall. The upper stories have balconies to overlook it.

Haydn Lannister

Weirwood Manse - Stark Estate

Leaping Trout Manse - Tully Estate

Watch House

The big stone watch house of the Roseroad Gate has arrow-slits rather than real windows. The building is kept well swept and clear, but it's too hard used to seem truly clean. A big plain main room has a large fireplace and a number of rough trestle-tables where watchmen may meet, eat, rest, and plan their actions. It is never left entirely unguarded, for the halls of the armouries and the cells both ends here. There are two wide wooden staircases leading up to the second floor.

There's almost always a pot over the fire, porridge in the morning and stew the rest of the day. Battered wooden counters stand against the wall on either side of the fireplace. On the one on the right are kept bowls and mugs, a keg of weak ale, and a few loaves of bread. The counter on the left has a wash-basin and a water-butt for cleaning up - each man is responsible for his own bowl, mug and spoon.

Edwin

Harbour Plaza

A narrow cobblestone street overlooking the Harbour, snaking northward into Oldtown Square at the heart of the city, and curving westward to the harbourfront. Lined with aged stone buildings, these support the weight of timber-framed over-hanging houses that look none too steady. The dockside can be seen quite clearly from the street, with the Whispering Sound beyond.

The shops here deal with the business of the sea. Fishmongers with carts and stalls, heaped full with fish of all kinds, cry their wares. Taverns and brothels, like the Black Mermaid Inn, await the coin of sailors fresh from the docks. The shabby Hammock House stands here, awaiting tenants. At the south end of the street, nearest the docks, stands the Beakhead House, a structure made from the wood of a wrecked ship, with the curved beakhead tip of her bow serving as an awning over the door.

The Black Mermaid Inn

A favourite brothel run by Danielle Tayle. Many of the girls who work there have taken to tattooing their hips with a floury fin-like belt as many mermaids are depicted as having. A (mostly) friendly rivalry has started as well that for every gold dragon earned a girl adds another delicate scale below the belt. So a client can see just how valuable his or her (yes there are man whores available too) whore of choice is. The term 'Pay by the scale' was coined at the black mermaid, as it has also become custom that every scale a whore has will cost the client a stag each. Of course, reasonable bargains are offered to regular guests.

Danielle Tayle

Raris Shipyard & Home

Harold Raris

Hammock House

A tenement mostly for sailors in between crews. The building itself is three-quarters of a ship that's bow up, the maidenhead pointing up to the sky like a large decorative weather vane. The cargo-hold doors now act as the entrance to the house. Inside all of the walls of the ship now act as ceilings and floors to cubicles that can be reached by a network of ladders. There's not a lot of privacy as the bedding for tenants is simply hundreds of hammocks strung between beams. It's only a groat a night. Belongings can be stored in provided trunks for a penny more or bags strung to close at hand beams, free of charge.

The Harbour

There are many ships that often regularly visit Oldtown and fill the docks with their different shapes and sizes. Below are some of these ships:

Drunken Kraken

One of the five ships that were hired by Lord Costayne to serve as the navy of Oldtown with one of the ships always found in port while the other four patrol the Bay of Crabs in pairs. This helps keep the visiting Pirates in line and furthers the illusion that Oldtown is a town of law and order.

Garrys

Black Whale

One of the five ships that were hired by Portmaster Costayne to serve as the navy of Oldtown with one of the ships always found in port while the other four patrol the Bay of Crabs in pairs. This helps keep the visiting Pirates in line and furthers the illusion that Oldtown is a town of law and order.

Skysinger

One of the five ships that were hired by Portmaster Costayne to serve as the navy of Oldtown with one of the ships always found in port while the other four patrol the Bay of Crabs in pairs. This helps keep the visiting Pirates in line and furthers the illusion that Oldtown is a town of law and order.

Mikael Beesbury

Wanderer

One of the five ships that were hired by Portmaster Costayne to serve as the navy of Oldtown with one of the ships always found in port while the other four patrol the Bay of Crabs in pairs. This helps keep the visiting Pirates in line and furthers the illusion that Oldtown is a town of law and order.

Iron Fist

One of the five ships that were hired by Portmaster Costayne to serve as the navy of Oldtown with one of the ships always found in port while the other four patrol the Bay of Crabs in pairs. This helps keep the visiting Pirates in line and furthers the illusion that Oldtown is a town of law and order.

Moondancer

A beautiful Braavosi Merchant Vessel captained by Yacio. Every time the Moondancer is sailing in rather close proximity to Oldtown, Yacio steers her into port for a visit. His best friend's widow (as far as he's concerned) and child live in town.

Oldtown Square

This area puts the old in Oldtown. The city is the oldest in Westeros and this part of it is where it all started. Between older but well-kept buildings are ruins of the First Men. Every era of Westeros can be seen in the nooks and crannies of this neighbourhood.

Usually, it is packed with people from all walks of life. Food vendors offer sizzling, toothsome-smelling dishes, and peddlers offering every sort of thing one can possibly buy with coin line the cobbled walkways crying carpets, weapons, wines, scrolls, armour, cloth, tools, cookware, and myriads of cheap trinkets and useful oddments. There is a general babble of voices as the city folk tries to negotiate with the sharp street vendors of Oldtown, and the occasional scuffle as the City Watch snatch up pickpockets and cutpurses from the crowd. The cacophony is made even greater by the constant stream of boys herding small groups of cattle, pigs, sheep and other livestock across the square from the stockyards to the Shambles, and the wagonloads of grains, flour, and other foodstuffs rolling out from the stockyards to make their way to other points throughout the city.

There are some worn stone benches here and there, and small grassy swards for the smallfolk to gather upon. In the centre of the square stand a set of four heavy wooden pillories, where wrongdoers are frequently held fast for public punishment.

Tom Tinker

The Bawdy Bard

Like a coin, the Bawdy Bard has two sides. On the west is a posh and rich atmosphere; on the east, rather seedy and questionable. Originally this was two buildings back to back to each other, one entrance facing the Undercity while the newer addition faced Oldtown Square. The main floor is known as The Hourglass Parlor due to its curious design, and it is obvious that this establishment is much more than a Brothel. There are rooms upstairs for every budget, and they are all clean and well cared for.

On the rather posh side, the well-maintained oak floors have been polished to a shine and lush red velvet oversized chairs are placed around black lacquered wooden tables. Leather booths with solid oak tables are lined up neatly and properly to provide a bit more privacy.

The seedy side couldn't be more opposite: cracked and scratched patchwork floors are covered with a thin layer of sawdust. Beat up tables in ill condition are placed haphazardly with no sense of order, with chairs in similar disarray line the floor. A few wooden booths line one side of the wall, all with rather interesting and often inappropriate things carved and scratched into the wood. However, over the years some of the too-seedy looking things have been thrown out and replaced with the furniture that's worn down from the west side of the brothel. So slowly but surely the east side is looking less and less run down.

In the centre of the parlour, there are two additional rooms — to the north, there is a small gambling hall. To the south a there's the theatre from which the establishment has gotten its name, for the girls and the Madam's old Mummer friends are known to put on some rather bawdy shows. Lining the sides of both these rooms are a pair of solid oak staircases leading up, the rails hand carved with rather explicit images of brothel girls performing their… duties.

The upstairs portion of the Bawdy Bard is a study in world cultures, as over the years whores from every crack of land have added their own touches to the resident area. From each wing, the west, and the east, there is a single stairwell that leads up to a gallery on the second floor. The east wing is more sparsely decorated, but there is a painting of each girl in tasteful nudes hung beside each door. On the bottom portion of each of the girls' frame are circular divots. Each divot is painted and sized according to the metal of the coin that is expected to be placed within. The money placed in the frame goes to the house before entering the room. Gratuity to the girl is appreciated before exiting the room.

The kitchen and dining area is shared by the girls on both sides of the brothel. It is centrally located in the resident upstairs area and takes up most of the northern half of the middle. While the madam's suite takes up a good portion of the south side. Both the suite and the dining room can be accessed by either wing. The kitchen is rather simple, but very well stocked in case a well-paying customer would like some food to keep up their energy.

Jessilyn Missy Zhonara Lik

Ragpyke Wynd

Second most sketchy area of Oldtown and the entrance to the first place winner of scum and villainy, the Undercity.

A cramped little route twisting snake-like through the city proper. There is scarce enough room for three grown men to walk side-by-side. The buildings here are heavily pitted and scarred, the stoneworking showing its age. Shambling timber buildings perch precariously atop them.

The door to the foundling house is just down the corner from Harbour Street, and a little further on there's a nook in the wall with a foundling wheel, its copper screen decorated with an image of The Mother.

A gutter, filled with effluvia and wastewater from the townspeople, runs down the middle of the street. Giving high great risk of being ankle-deep in flowing sewage. Occasionally chamber pots and other less savoury things are emptied from above, requiring travellers to watch the windows of the timber shambles above them.

The Foundling House

The Foundling House on Ragpickers' Wynd is perhaps the finest place in Oldtown to abandon an infant. There's even a foundling wheel that is set in the wall adjacent to Ragpickers' Wynd, a small revolving door set waist-high with a bell-pull beside it so the septas who collect the child will never see who left it.

The inside of this timber addition is lime-washed twice yearly from its beams to its floor and thus sharply white. It is furnished as a dormitory for children, with rows of mismatched bunks that charitable sailors have built of shipyard scrap. Some have straw mattresses, some just straw, but it's relatively clean. About halfway down the long room from the door to the sept, there's a steep rail-less staircase leading to a half-story, where the septas and septons have their cells.

There's a small hearth near the small door that leads into the sept. There a stingy fire is kept going under a large black kettle. Cribs for infants and chairs for their adult caretakers stand alongside a pen containing a wise-eyed white milk-goat.

Infants are loaned out to professional wet-nurses who are between employers or fed by wet-nurses who come by, or in a pinch, on the goat. Once weaned they are fostered at septrys and motherhouses or on farms. The older children who are abundant here were mostly not left as infants but were orphaned later, or simply neglected. One can hire them from the Septon for a day's work, but no one makes any attempt to keep them from going out to the streets.

Any child can get a bed here, and a bowl of gruel twice a day. It's most often made with spent grain from the breweries, and cabbage. A child who eats but never sticks around to work at hire or help scrub the floors will in time be noticed and turned away from the pot.


Sphinx Street

Sphinx Street is where many a pious or studious sort live. It is a mixture of styles of homes and range from poor but well kept, to austere or stately. Nothing hower as grand as that which is found on Beacon Boulevard. It gets its name from the two great green stone sphinxes that flank the gates of the citadel to the east. One has the face of a man, the other that of a woman. On the westerly side of the neighbourhood lies the tourney grounds just outside the city.

The long street runs along the west side of the Honeywine River. It is wide, and the large paving stones are well-maintained. The rows of genteel houses that line it are broken up on the west of the street by alleys and wynds, and on the east by a few small riverfront gardens, each occupied by handsome twisted old apple trees, flower beds, and a stone bench or two.

Bulwer Manse

Militant and austere, the Bulwer Manse is white stone blocks with bloodred mortar. Several generations ago the Bulwer lands were home to the largest bull in known history. It won prizes and lived a long and very pampered life. After it died its skull was scraped and dried and to this day decorates above the door of the home. Beyond the skull, there is no real decoration. Simple wood and leather furnishings that are comfortable, though nothing much to look at. The house colors of blood red and white accent where they can in draperies and other cloth items.

Like most Reach noble houses, the Bulwers have a home to come to here in Oldtown. Unlike most nobles, the Bulwers have not stayed there for decades. Not since the incident between a Braavosi Water Dancer killing Trenton Bulwer in a duel over Trenton's Costayne wife.

Guildhouse Row

The Guildhalls of Oldtown stand here, where the river is wide and the light of the Hightower strong. The street is wide enough for several laden carts to pass at once and well paved with large flagstones of a utilitarian grey granite.

The Halls themselves are heavy buildings, and most of them have an almost fortified look to them, thick walls and few windows, foreboding and serious. They vary in size, and in the type of stone used, but most of them are larger than the manses of all but the very wealthy, and unlike the city's residences, they do not share walls with one another. Many of the Halls on the east side of the street have private docks on the Honeywine, complete with boathouses and small warehouses that put the businesses of individual small merchants to shame.

The Wreck

Legend has it that several generations ago, a sailor cursed the Drowned God, and for that, the Drowned God threw the sailors boat right out of the ocean where it landed on the outskirts of Oldtown bottoms up. Just barely out of the legal bounds of the city, this is often where people with an aim to draw steel go to settle matters. As can be imagined it is quite the thorn in The Watches side, the secret everyone knows about. A hole in the bow now makes for easy disposal of the loser. The ballast of the wrecked ship now the rotted corpses and skeletons of those that lost.


Starry Street

This is a wide, relatively quiet street, leading to the prestigious Starry Sept of Oldtown. The large and gracious manses of the wealthy line the street on either side, their doors flanked by armed guards. The Sept rises skyward at the western end, dominating the street. The long stretch of Sphinx Street runs north up the western side of the river, with the towers of the Citadel at its end. Running south is the Guildhall Row with its sombre, semi-fortified halls and guild-owned docks.

There are poles all along Starry Street, each bearing a banner depicting the Seven-Pointed Star in gold, on a white field. The cobblestones are heavily worn, smoothed to a shine by the treading of the pious on their way to the Sept. The stones are kept immaculately clean, as are the balusters of the bridge.

Starry Sept

The Starry Sept is the seat of the Faith of the Seven. The High Septon resides here, as do any number of clergy who study here or attend him and the faithful. Seven domes and seven towers make up the structure, all of them richly decorated with seven-pointed stars, carved or inlaid or painted, or in mosaics of tiles.

The largest dome, the worship area, is a heptagon like all the others, but much wider. The seven-pointed star is inlaid into the black marble floor in massive slices of highly polished semi-precious stones: amethyst and rose quartz, jade and lapis lazuli, onyx, cat-eye, and garnet. The soaring domed roof is painted a deep blue with glittering sparkles of mica mixed in, and hundreds of seven-pointed stars picked out in gold and silver leaf.

Each of the seven walls holds a statue, larger than life, of one of the gods. The Father, The Mother, The Warrior, The Maiden, The Smith, The Crone, and The Stranger. They are painted wood, beautifully and realistically carved by artists of great skill. Their gowns and robes are leafed in gold and set with jewels, and their eyes are alabaster and jet, with irises of sapphire or emerald or deep brown citrine. The exception is The Stranger. His or her statue is plain, almost stylized, the face hooded and the robes painted glossy black with minute flecks of black dragonglass. that make it glitter very faintly, like the most distant of stars.

There is an ornately carved and inlaid altar before each statue, for the faithful to pray, and light their candles.


The Honeywine River

The Honeywine is the largest river in the Reach. Beginning near Brightwater Keep (the seat of House Florent), it flows south and is joined by a tributary at Honeyholt, then continues south to Oldtown where it is joined by a tributary originating to the east by Uplands. It then flows into Whispering Sound at southern Oldtown. The Honeywine is the agricultural capital of the Reach.

Guildhalls on Sphinx Street line the western banks, while the Citadel spreads across both sides. Downstream is the Starry Sept and manses. The Seven Shrines and their gardens are also located near the Honeywine. The Quill and Tankard are located on an island in the river, while the Ravenry is found on another. A river road runs alongside the slow-moving Honeywine through the heart of the city.

There are several bridges that criss-cross the river, but three major bridges stand out:

The Citadel Bridge

The Citadel, seat of all Maesters spans the entire river, high arches of indestructible stone in the foundation allow the Honeywine to flow freely north to south through the rest of Oldtown. The bridge itself is wide and at the centre of the bridge's peak is the drawbridge on the northern side into the Citadel itself. The gates are flanked by a pair of tall green sphinxes with the bodies of lions, the wings of eagles and the tails of serpents. One has the face of a man, the other a woman. Of the three major bridges in Oldtown, the Citadel Bridge is the most austere. Strong, simple, but stunning. The only real thing of note about them is that the chains of previous Archmaesters and legendary Maesters are transfixed to the bridge, be it hanging from the wrought iron lamps or set into the stones of the bridge. The precious metals are left alone by the ilk of Oldtown for it is said that anyone that should steal even a chip of a link and anyone that touches it thereafter will face a most horrific slow death.

The Citadel

The origin of the Citadel is disputed, but House Hightower is generally considered to have played an integral role in its foundation.[4] Most accounts on the Citadel's origins credit its foundation to Prince Peremore the Twisted, the second son of King Uthor of the High Tower. The curious Peremore invited numerous scholars, including wise men, teachers, priests, healers, singers, wizards, alchemists, and sorcerers, to Oldtown. After Peremore's death, his brother, King Urrigon, granted land alongside the Honeywine to "Peremore's pets", who developed the tract into the maesters' Citadel. House Hightower continues to be a strong patron of learning to this very day.

Thane Thricewise Vaegon

The Isle of Ravens

The Isle of Ravens is linked to the eastern bank of the Honeywine by a weathered wooden drawbridge. On the island is located the Ravenry, the oldest building of the Citadel. The walls of the Ravenry are covered in moss and vines and within its yard sits a weirwood tree on which the Ravens like to perch. The white raven rookery is located in the west tower. For security reasons, those that worship the Old Gods are not allowed access to the weirwood. The Maesters are happy to direct and worshipers to the weirwood garden that's on Starry Street. There are separate rookeries, the white in the west tower and the black in the north tower, as the two colours of ravens quarrel.

In the Age of Heroes, the Ravenry was supposedly a stronghold of a pirate lord who picked off ships as they came downriver.

The Quill and Tankard

The Quill and Tankard, a famous Oldtown Inn that has never closed in five hundred years. The building is a noble old half-timber structure with plastered stone between the enormous old black beams. It sits on a small rock of an island at the edge of the Honeywine River and is accessed by a little footbridge, or by water-taxi.

Rivermen and seamen, smiths and singers, priests and princes, Lords and sellswords, travellers both noble and small, and the novices and acolytes of the Citadel - all come for a taste of the fearsomely strong apple cider that makes this inn so beloved by Oldtown's people. There is a pleasant buzz of chatter, cups and tankards being filled and refilled, and general laughter. The fire in the hearth allows for a merry glow and a comfortable warmth from Oldtown's breezy, misty cobblestone streets. Benches and tables offer places to sit, and there is a deliciously toothsome smell in the air of food from the back.

The Starry Bridge

The Starry Street Bridge with its seven arches and the multitude of seven-pointed stars decorating its stonework makes up the eastern end of the street. It spans the Honeywine to connect with Oldtown Square.

The Hightower Bridge

Where the Citadel bridge is austere and the Starry Bridge is pious, Hightower Bridge is Majestic. Statues of the old Hightower Kings line the white stone arches that cross the Honeywine River. Braziers which are miniature replicas of the Hightower are always lit night or day. A massive drawbridge is what connects Hightower Bridge with Battle Island to the south where the tallest building in all of Westeros literally towers high over its city. Guards of House Hightower are always patrolling the bridge. Sometimes they are joined by the Tyrell and Targaryen Guards as well.

An elegant green marble bridge with gilded railings and starlings that resemble woven rose bushes arches from Hightower bridge to the northwest connecting to Garden Isle where the Estate of House Tyrell can be seen towering over the walls hidden by verdant hedges.

Another bridge that connects the island to the northeast is undoubtedly the Royal Estate in Oldtown. Stone Dragons soar and twist together along the black marble bridge. Even when there is no royal at home, the island is well guarded and its household on premises awaiting any sudden royal visitor.

Garden Isle - The Estate of House Tyrell

A grand manse stands on the centre of a small island. Over a stone bridge wide enough for a vintner's wagon, a dark, two-story building rises, with two 60-foot-high towers at the northwest and southeast corners of the manor. High, arched windows have been secured with iron bars on the ground floor. Steps lead up to a small porch, flanked by pillars of twisting thorns and roses made from gilded and lacquered iron. Ten-foot-tall, five-foot-wide double doors of iron-banded oak provide entrance into the manse. In the centre of each door is carved an enormous Tyrell rose, gilded and gleaming.

While the estate's bridge connects to Hightower Bridge to the southwest, the front of the building faces Starry Street to the northwest, giving a fine view of the domes and towers of the Starry Sept.

A magnificent walled garden surrounds the estate taking up the entire island. So that it can be viewed from all the mansion's windows. The upper stories have balconies to overlook it. Two centuries-old oaks dominate the area, their canopy offering shade, but there are also flower beds all around. Pansies of various colours dominate, but there are also marigolds, tulips, and of course, roses in white, red, and especially Tyrell gold.

The first floor's main hall is grand, open room dominated by a massive fireplace and high-arched windows facing the street, protected by heavy iron bars. The white walls and polished white marble floors make it seem airy and bright. The starkness of the walls is softened by three long tapestries, depicting fantastical hunting scenes, while the marble floor is cushioned by rich Myrish rugs. Down the centre of the hall is a long, wide dining table, able to seat thirty comfortably. At the head of the table is an enormous chair of elaborately carved rosewood, with a door behind flanked by two high windows, giving a view of the sunlight gardens. Near the fireplace are smaller chairs, cushioned benches, and small tables for more intimate conversations.

Alcoves and doors on either side of the great hall lead to servants quarters, kitchens, and smaller sitting rooms. At the northwest and southeast corners of the building are square towers holding the stairs up to the floor above, where the bedchambers and other sitting rooms are found.

Battle Island and The Hightower - House Hightower

Battle Island sets in the Whispering Sound near to the mouth of the Honeywine. It has no banks nor beaches, only great basalt cliffs that tower a hundred feet or more above the water, depending on weather and tide. The only easy access is a wide arched bridge of white stone that attaches to Hightower Bridge to the north of the island. It is guarded day and night by knights loyal to House Hightower.

The island is dominated by the Hightower itself, a stepped tower over seven hundred feet tall made of bright white stone. Its top tier houses a great beacon fire, visible for miles out to sea. It is the tallest structure in all of Westeros. Besides the site where there are mule-powered pulleys to lift the wood for the beacon fires off of the ships that bring it, there are little walls around the island's edges. They're white stone, and low, just enough to keep House Hightower's smallest members from venturing over the cliffs. Aside from the stable and one small guardhouse, the island is dedicated to gardens with flowers of many colours, fruit trees, pretty paths of white cobblestones, white fountains, and white stone pavilions.

The great tower is all of white stone, ancient and beautiful, but for the lowest part, which is seamless black, akin to dragonglass, and more ancient still. This lowest tier is quite wide and grand enough for any palace. There are two stories of this bottom part of the tower, and while the grand entry is wide and open, the corridors are a twisting maze of black stone. The tower has a narrower white stone tier above, and a circular balcony-garden on the roof-space left unoccupied.

The ground floor is dominated by this grand receiving hall, and the great main doors lead directly to it. High windows let in light that reflects off the glossy walls and make the space airy and brighter than one would think black stone would allow. It is here that the Lord of Hightower holds his local court, from a large chair on a tall wooden dais. Both chair and dais are carved with images of the tower itself, and with dolphins and sea-dragons. They are inlaid with stones of white and grey and decorated with silver-leaf. There's space for the Lord's councillors to sit alongside him, but visitors seeking audience must stand. Past this grand hall, there is a wide gracious stone stairway allowing access to the higher levels. Hidden behind the wall behind it and to and on one side, ramps allow wagon-loads of firewood for the beacon to be hauled up.

Alon Hightower Brydon Hightower Fedrick Far-Eyes Garmund Hightower Gwayne Hightower Hobert Hightower Kina Hightower Lynesse Hightower Lyonel Hightower Martyn Hightower Ormund Hightower Otho III Hightower Rosyn Hightower

Dragon Isle - The Royal Estate of House Targaryen

Baelon Targaryen

The Undercity

An unseemly stench of unwashed bodies, sewage, litter, and other unpleasant things assails one's nose here. The cramped, twisted streets of the Undercity are almost reminiscent of the pens of an abattoir, and, indeed, there are mysterious red marks not too different from that of blood here and there. The buildings here look as like to crumble any moment. Some are leaning precariously, propped up with blocks of stone and timbers. Others are so heavily built-over with crude timber, that they can barely be perceived under the wood. It is always wet in this low lying area, and the tops of the overcrowded buildings are so close together that the sunlight barely reaches through.

Poxy whores, sellswords, thieves, footpads, cutpurses, hedge wizards, robber knights, pirates, and pickpockets roam the claustrophobic little streets, on the prowl for coin, an unsuspecting victim from the city proper, or merely the next big adventure. There is a throng of smallfolk all about the gateway to the Thieves' Market. There are very few City Watchmen here, and when there are, they travel in a tight, almost phalanx-like formation, shield to shield, spears out and at the ready.

Thieves Market

A dingy, dirty little market square, packed nearly from wall to wall with people. The din of shouting and screaming and chatter is nearly deafening, along with the scramble and rush of people. Here one can get the sorts of things the well-to-do, law-abiding shops would not ordinarily stock.

Poisons, potions, philtres, smuggling items such as extra long boots, cloaks, rings with hidden compartments, and the things that were smuggled inside them. Exotic drugs, spices, wines from Across The Narrow Sea, jewelry, and stranger things besides. Whores of all kinds patrol the tight little market, scantily dressed or not at all, the better to sell what they have to offer the good people of the Undercity.

The archway to the west allows one to escape the dingy little market.

Court of Thieves

This reception chamber is reached through a secure waiting room. Though it is known as a court, the windowless chamber hardly resembles the grand courts of the nobility. It is a long room, with a sunken floor for a handful of supplicants to stand while they plead their favors and grievances. Upon the higher section of floor sits a long table that serves as a desk for a tribunal to hear cases. The table is constructed of sturdy wood and provides a suitable barricade (and a place for stashed weapons) in case of trouble. Behind the table are three carved chairs, the center chair being the tallest, the next tallest to its right, and the smallest to the left of center. When Court is in session, the room is always protected by armed guards. Two doors behind the tribunal table lead further into the building.

Deepwater Manse

Access to the "manse" is tightly controlled, the only obvious entrance being through the heavily secured and guarded Court of Thieves. Within, the house is deceptively small, made to seem larger by its confusing layout of halls and doorways, creating something of a labyrinth to those unused to navigating it. The whole of it is decorated with tapestries, hide-paintings, masks, and various other nods to Essosi cultures, though predominantly that of Lys. The downstairs is dominated by a large parlor, in which many cushioned lounges and armchairs are situated around a central firepit. A sizeable dining room can accommodate twenty or more guests. Upstairs are several bedrooms, with the only windows in the building, each barred and too small for an average man to fit through.

Xhabo Duna

Whispering Wharf

The docks of the wharf are lined with a vast array of wood-and-stone piers, cranes, and winches dedicated to the unloading and loading of cargo and passengers alike. The protection of the white stone wall jetty that bends like a hugging arm around the docks makes this the perfect place to anchor smaller vessels. Such as the riverboats, small pleasure ships, fishing boats, and the like. Nicely tucked away from any turbulent waters of the Whispering Sound or river.

The Bait and Tackle

One of the seedier taverns it's on the cusp of the Fisherman's Quarter and the Merchant's Quarter so it gets a variety of clientele. The front right window is currently boarded up after a stool went through it in an altercation between a Braavosi Captain and some sailors from the Vale. The captain of the vessel from Vale didn't react well to being slapped like a bitch by the Braavosi Captain after he insulted the Braavosi's mode of dress.

Portmaster's Mansion

The Portmaster of Oldtown is Killian Costayne. He is strict but also fair and does his best to make sure his area (the docks, harbour, Whispering Sound, Honeywine River and all thing nautical) of authority is a safe place for anyone to be. The home has been passed down through the generations to the appointed Portmaster and their family. Killian's father's father had the job and it's been a bit of a hereditary position. But only because his bloodline does the job so well.

The Portmaster's office occupies the one-room ground floor of a small house though it is fit for a noble and even a royal visit with how it's decorated and maintained. A heavy, long, and wide counter block visitors from easily accessing all but the front quarter of the room. It's kept well cleared, and the Portmaster and his clerks might be seated behind it to attend to the needs of sea-captains and tradesmen. Beyond it, the office is an organized maze of small desks with papers and chalk-marked slates and wax-coated tablets and counting-beads sorted neatly over their tops. Storage trunks and cabinets add to the maze. Some of the larger ones have big heavy locks.

At the very back of the room, there's a steep narrow staircase allowing access to the upper story. Where there is an open living area that is richly decorated. Chic and masculine. Several respects are paid to House Costayne in little details about the room. But the largest and most obvious respect given is the Costayne Crest on a shield above the fireplace mantle. Hundreds of bottles are also on the mantle, various sizes, all on their side on little wooden or metal stands. All filled with tiny ship models from around the world. The wall at the south of the building is mostly windows, large affairs made up of many small panes. They offer quite a grand view of the harbourfront. Several rooms surround the main living area with its hearth, dining area, entertaining area close to the fire. The bedrooms range from nearly empty, but a single seven-pointed star with a cot and small table, to a rather grand master bedroom fit for a noble with expensive tastes and the means to acquire them.

Clara Killian Costayne Rona Vielo

Maps & Images

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